Draft Export Control Bills Package 2019

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Public consultations are now closed.

Consultation commenced on 11 September 2019 and closed on 9 October 2019.

We are improving Australia’s agricultural export legislation. This is part of our wider initiative to strengthen and grow Australian agricultural exports and market access.

During public consultation, f eedback was sought on the Draft Export Control Bills Package 2019. This includes the

  • draft Export Control Bill 2019 (the Bill).

The package also includes drafts of four Bills that will ensure a smooth transition from the old legislation to the new:

  • draft Export Control (Consequential Amendments and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2019 (the C&T Bill)
  • draft Export Charges (Imposition-Customs) Amendment Bill 2019
  • draft Export Charges (Imposition-Excise) Amendment Bill 2019
  • draft Export Charges (Imposition-General) Amendment Bill 2019.

Context

In 2015 we reviewed agricultural export legislation.

During the review we:

  • analysed existing legislation
  • released a discussion paper
  • called for public submissions
  • held stakeholder workshops in all states and territories.

Based on the review, the government decided to improve agricultural export legislation.

Agricultural exports are currently regulated by over 20 Acts and 40 pieces of delegated legislation. Existing export-related requirements are being streamlined and consolidated into new legislation, including the Export Control Bill 2019 and a set of Export Control Rules 2020.

The improvements will provide the same level of regulatory oversight while:

  • making laws more relevant, responsive and efficient for exporters, farmers and other primary producers
  • removing duplication
  • ensuring consistency across commodities where possible.

This will help exporters, farmers and other primary producers understand and comply with the laws.

The Export Control Bill 2019 will be the key piece of primary legislation in the new framework. In 2017 we consulted on a draft Export Control Bill 2017. The Export Control Bill 2017 was introduced into the Australian Parliament on 7 December 2017. It lapsed with the prorogation of the Australian Parliament for the 2019 General Election. We are working with the government to determine when the Bill will be re-introduced.

The Summary of amendments to the draft Export Control Bill 2019 describes differences between the 2019 and 2017 versions of the Bill.

The Export Control Rules 2020 are based on the current Export Control commodity orders. In 2018 and 2019 we consulted on draft rules for meat, milk, fish and eggs. We will continue to draft and consult on commodity-specific rules.

How you had your say

We sought feedback from people across government and the agricultural export sector. This included:

  • Industry/peak bodies
  • Government agencies
  • Exporters and producers
  • Departmental officers
  • Authorised officers
  • Industry consultative committees
  • Other community groups.

You gave feedback through:

  • information sessions held around Australia
  • online written submissions.

Who engaged

Online Submissions

We received 10 submissions from businesses, industry groups. Most submissions have been published. A small number were marked confidential in part, or in full.

Meetings

53 industry representatives and peak bodies from across the export supply chain attended an information session. Among other sectors, they included grains, meat and livestock, horticulture, organics and dairy. Information sessions were held in:

  • Brisbane, QLD
  • Sydney, NSW
  • Canberra, ACT
  • Melbourne, VIC
  • Adelaide, SA
  • Perth, WA
  • Launceston, TAS

What you said

In general, most stakeholders supported a simpler and more flexible export legislative framework. The submissions were generally positive and did not lead to substantial changes to the 2019 Bill prior to introduction. Amongst the responses there was clear recognition of the role of efficient and effective export legislation in underpinning the growth and maintenance of our export industries. Stakeholders expressed widespread support for the expanded range of sanctions and welcomed the streamlining of regulatory arrangements.

What happens next

We have considered all submissions, and where appropriate, changes were made to the Bill before it was introduced to Parliament. The Bills were introduced into parliament on 4 December 2019.

We will continue to collaborate with stakeholders as we draft the rules and other legislation. You will be able to have your say on these as they are developed.

Register your interest to stay informed about consultation on other draft export legislation.

Public consultations are now closed.

Consultation commenced on 11 September 2019 and closed on 9 October 2019.

We are improving Australia’s agricultural export legislation. This is part of our wider initiative to strengthen and grow Australian agricultural exports and market access.

During public consultation, f eedback was sought on the Draft Export Control Bills Package 2019. This includes the

  • draft Export Control Bill 2019 (the Bill).

The package also includes drafts of four Bills that will ensure a smooth transition from the old legislation to the new:

  • draft Export Control (Consequential Amendments and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2019 (the C&T Bill)
  • draft Export Charges (Imposition-Customs) Amendment Bill 2019
  • draft Export Charges (Imposition-Excise) Amendment Bill 2019
  • draft Export Charges (Imposition-General) Amendment Bill 2019.

Context

In 2015 we reviewed agricultural export legislation.

During the review we:

  • analysed existing legislation
  • released a discussion paper
  • called for public submissions
  • held stakeholder workshops in all states and territories.

Based on the review, the government decided to improve agricultural export legislation.

Agricultural exports are currently regulated by over 20 Acts and 40 pieces of delegated legislation. Existing export-related requirements are being streamlined and consolidated into new legislation, including the Export Control Bill 2019 and a set of Export Control Rules 2020.

The improvements will provide the same level of regulatory oversight while:

  • making laws more relevant, responsive and efficient for exporters, farmers and other primary producers
  • removing duplication
  • ensuring consistency across commodities where possible.

This will help exporters, farmers and other primary producers understand and comply with the laws.

The Export Control Bill 2019 will be the key piece of primary legislation in the new framework. In 2017 we consulted on a draft Export Control Bill 2017. The Export Control Bill 2017 was introduced into the Australian Parliament on 7 December 2017. It lapsed with the prorogation of the Australian Parliament for the 2019 General Election. We are working with the government to determine when the Bill will be re-introduced.

The Summary of amendments to the draft Export Control Bill 2019 describes differences between the 2019 and 2017 versions of the Bill.

The Export Control Rules 2020 are based on the current Export Control commodity orders. In 2018 and 2019 we consulted on draft rules for meat, milk, fish and eggs. We will continue to draft and consult on commodity-specific rules.

How you had your say

We sought feedback from people across government and the agricultural export sector. This included:

  • Industry/peak bodies
  • Government agencies
  • Exporters and producers
  • Departmental officers
  • Authorised officers
  • Industry consultative committees
  • Other community groups.

You gave feedback through:

  • information sessions held around Australia
  • online written submissions.

Who engaged

Online Submissions

We received 10 submissions from businesses, industry groups. Most submissions have been published. A small number were marked confidential in part, or in full.

Meetings

53 industry representatives and peak bodies from across the export supply chain attended an information session. Among other sectors, they included grains, meat and livestock, horticulture, organics and dairy. Information sessions were held in:

  • Brisbane, QLD
  • Sydney, NSW
  • Canberra, ACT
  • Melbourne, VIC
  • Adelaide, SA
  • Perth, WA
  • Launceston, TAS

What you said

In general, most stakeholders supported a simpler and more flexible export legislative framework. The submissions were generally positive and did not lead to substantial changes to the 2019 Bill prior to introduction. Amongst the responses there was clear recognition of the role of efficient and effective export legislation in underpinning the growth and maintenance of our export industries. Stakeholders expressed widespread support for the expanded range of sanctions and welcomed the streamlining of regulatory arrangements.

What happens next

We have considered all submissions, and where appropriate, changes were made to the Bill before it was introduced to Parliament. The Bills were introduced into parliament on 4 December 2019.

We will continue to collaborate with stakeholders as we draft the rules and other legislation. You will be able to have your say on these as they are developed.

Register your interest to stay informed about consultation on other draft export legislation.