Draft Australian Priority Marine Pest List

Consultation has concluded

We are seeking comment on the draft Australian Priority Marine Pest List (APMPL).

Marine pests are non-native marine plants or animals that have the potential to harm Australia’s marine environment. Marine pests can threaten biodiversity through predation, competition for habitat or food, and by altering ecosystems. They can affect the economy, social amenity, human health, the environment and our industries (such as shipping, fisheries, tourism).

Criteria for species that will be included on the new APMPL:

  • nationally significant (according to nationally agreed criteria)
  • likely to be identified in the marine environment
  • possible to eradicate if there is an incursion.

Purpose of the new list will be to inform states, and the Northern Territory, of marine pests that:

  • could have a significant impact if they were to arrive, establish and spread in Australian waters
  • warrant action to limit their spread, if already present in Australia.

The list will also help us speed up a response to any new incursions.

You can now provide comments on the draft report, discussion paper and fact sheets described in this review. Make sure you consider the purpose of the list and the criteria outlined on this page.

We are seeking comment on the draft Australian Priority Marine Pest List (APMPL).

Marine pests are non-native marine plants or animals that have the potential to harm Australia’s marine environment. Marine pests can threaten biodiversity through predation, competition for habitat or food, and by altering ecosystems. They can affect the economy, social amenity, human health, the environment and our industries (such as shipping, fisheries, tourism).

Criteria for species that will be included on the new APMPL:

  • nationally significant (according to nationally agreed criteria)
  • likely to be identified in the marine environment
  • possible to eradicate if there is an incursion.

Purpose of the new list will be to inform states, and the Northern Territory, of marine pests that:

  • could have a significant impact if they were to arrive, establish and spread in Australian waters
  • warrant action to limit their spread, if already present in Australia.

The list will also help us speed up a response to any new incursions.

You can now provide comments on the draft report, discussion paper and fact sheets described in this review. Make sure you consider the purpose of the list and the criteria outlined on this page.

  • To make a submission:

    • read the discussion paper PDF [1.2 MB] and accompanying information, and the sections of the report that you are interested in
    • share your thoughts through our Ideas Tool or submit your feedback to us by emailing MSPC.

    Any submissions must have a sound rationale for comments, bearing in mind the constraints under which the list was developed and its purpose.

    Submissions on the draft report will close on Friday, 1 June 2018.

    All comments will be considered before finalising the review.

    Writing of theContinue reading

    To make a submission:

    • read the discussion paper PDF [1.2 MB] and accompanying information, and the sections of the report that you are interested in
    • share your thoughts through our Ideas Tool or submit your feedback to us by emailing MSPC.

    Any submissions must have a sound rationale for comments, bearing in mind the constraints under which the list was developed and its purpose.

    Submissions on the draft report will close on Friday, 1 June 2018.

    All comments will be considered before finalising the review.

    Writing of the report was funded under the Australian Government’s 2015 Review of National Marine Pest Biosecurity. This is one way we are improving our ability to respond to marine pest incursions and spread.

    Start by submitting an idea